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Grow Tulasi Save Mankind

GROW TULASI SAVE MANKIND: Goal of this project to reach each family one Tulasi plant.10,00,000/- plants to be Distributed FREE DASH LAKSHA TULASI YOJANE in and around Bangalore and other places. Till OCT-2014 we have already Distributed 2,25,000/- plants

We have already distributed at Sri Raghavendra Swami maTa. Mantralaya, Raj Bhavan. Bangalore, Intel Office in Bangalore through Eco watch, Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan thorugh SAKSI,Bangalore, Swami Vivekananda Yoga University Jigani ,Sriman MAdhwa Sangha Chamarajapet, Vidya Peeta, Bangalore,Sri Swanandashrama,Dr Vishnuvardhan’s residence,Bangalore,5th  block,4th block,RR Nagar,Hosakerehally and many more SRS mutts Chidambarashrama Gubbi,Tumkur and,Signals.Busstands,Fires Station,Police Station,BUS, are some places.

ABOUT TULASI: Tulasi in sanskrit means "incomparable one". It is an aromatic short shrub, It belongs to the basil family.

Atharvavedahas acknowledged the curative effect of the juice of the Tulasi leaves. On the basis of drug value Charaka classified plants into purgatives and astringents. The preeminently astringent groups are fifty in number. They have been further grouped under the heads or Vargas and included surasa (Tulasi) in the eighth varga in swasahara. Susruta on the same basis classified plants under thirty-seven sections or ganas. Susruta has included Surasa in the saka varga, the group of pot herbs that comes under the spices of herbs

Uses of Tulasi: Guards Against Cough and Cold, Builds Strength and Stamina, Regulates Blood Sugar, Rich in Antioxidants, Lowers Cholesterol, Eliminates Toxins, Anti-Asthmatic, Improves Digestion, Tulasi is carminative, antipyretic, diaphoretic, expectorant and vermifugal, Promotes healthy Metabolism, Balances Blood pressure, Anti-Stress Agent, Strengthens immunity, Purifies the blood, Relives Anxiety, Slows ageing, Plant that  every one respects for  its Medicinal/religious/ spiritual qualities and part of our Medicinal practices from Ancient times.

TULASI MANE: Any Family member/s who are interested in keeping the plants at their homes in different areas of Bangalore for distribution are called Tualsimane. You will be given plants to distribute as per your free day/time, also you can decide to do this program once a week/month/once in 6 months or once a year or on any festive occasion. we will announce via SMS to our contacts to collect from your home, you can also distribute to any one whom you like, but ONE FAMILY ONE PLANT to be followed, Idea is to reach more Families through Tulasimane.

Tulasi Marga(road) Group of Homes on SAME road join together to plant Tulasi and look after in their respective roads and protect plants. We have experienced it reduces weed plant growth like Parthenium and other plants and keeps environment free from pollution.

TULASI VANA: Institutions/Schools/Private firms or Group of Tualsimane homes can join and adopt a public place to develop Tulasi Vana a small portion of park or unused public areas (with necessary permission from concerned authorities).This helps to improve Quality of breathing air, let us contribute to save us from global warming.

 

SRI GURUKRUPA SEVA TRUST

reg off:424, H cr, Ph 2,Ideal Homes Township,RajarrajeshwariNagar,Bangalore-98

Contact: 9844027231,9844350235,9740633005,9901534578,9886767780,

080-28601980,26540945.

 

GROW TULASI SAVE MANKIND

Tulasiis a herb, goddess, medicine, antiseptic, health food, tonic, insect repellant, and air purifier, even your passport to heaven all rolled into one. It has been a part of our homes, our temples, our rituals, our everyday lives for centuries; a revered, beloved member of our family whom we name our daughters after.For several ailments, if a potted plant can bring a solution why not we revive the old practice of a tulasi-brundavana at our home. The Tulasi is, but one of the cultural and ecological practices that we inherited from our ancestors.

Who is Tulasi? –

Tulasi is the avatara of Sri Mahalakshmi. During Samudra Mathana period, Srihari came in as Dhanvantry. From this Vaidya Roopi Srihari – Dhanvantry, he came holding Suvarna Kalasha comprising of Amrutha from the ocean. At that time anandashru (eye drops ) came out of Sri Dhanvantri roopi paramathma and this drops turned out to be tulasi. Ceremonial marriage of Tulasi plant with Lord Vishnu is performed on this day. It is customary to put Saligrama and Tulasi plant and getting marriage of them.

Tulasi or the holy basil is considered sacred especially by the vaishnavas.      There are three different types- Ramatulasi, Krishnatulasi and Sritulasi.       Some people consider that there are 5 types- Sritulasi, kshudrapatratulasi, raktatulasi, bilvagandhatulasi, krishnatulasi and varvaritulasi.
Tulasi was born out of the tears of Vishnu when Amrithakalasha came from the ocean during the great churning.     The leaves/daLa are used in the ritualistic worship.     Almost all Hindus maintain a brindavana with a tulasi plant.     Tulasi is also considered as a goddess and a consort of vishnu.
Tulasi leaves have several medicinal uses.

The Padma Purana glorifies Tulasi as an eternal associate of Lord Krishna and considers Tulasi as the essence of all devotional activities. Its leaves, flowers, roots, bark, branches, stem and its very shade are all spiritual.

Atharvavedahas acknowledged the curative effect of the juice of the Tulasi leaves. On the basis of drug value Charaka classified plants into purgatives and astringents. The preeminently astringent groups are fifty in number. They have been further grouped under the heads or Vargas and included surasa (Tulasi) in the eighth varga in swasahara. Susruta on the same basis classified plants under thirty-seven sections or ganas. Susruta has included Surasa in the saka varga, the group of potherbs that comes under the spices of herbs

 The pharmacologistshave confirmed that the Tulasi have significant anti-stress properties. Ocimum lowered stress induced cholesterol and enzyme activities as well as it reduced blood glucose and urea levels in rats pretreated with ocimum leaf extracts. The researchers have speculated that eugenol that produced similar effects moreover lowered stress induced blood glucose levels may be responsible for the anti-stress effect of Tulasi. Stress is known to cause immunosuppression and modify host resistance to a variety of illnesses, including allergic and infectious disorders. Similar immunomodulatory activity has also been observed in Tinospora malabarica used extensively to treat constant rheumatism, inflammation and allergic disorders.

 

Uses of Tulasi:

Guards Against Cough and Cold,Builds Strength and Stamina,Regulates Blood Sugar

Rich in Antioxidants,Lowers Cholestrol,Eliminates Toxins,Anti-Asthmatic

Improves Digestion,Tulasi is carminative, antipyretic, diaphoretic, expectorant and vermifugal, Promotes healthy Metabolism,Balances Blood pressure,Anti-Stress Agent,Strengthens immunity,Purifies the blood,Relives Anxiety,Slows ageing

1. Healing Power:

The tulsi plant has many medicinal properties. The leaves are a nerve tonic and also sharpen memory. They promote the removal of the catarrhal matter and phlegm from the bronchial tube. The leaves strengthen the stomach and induce copious perspiration. The seed of the plant are mucilaginous.

2. Fever & Common Cold: The leaves of basil are specific for many fevers. During the rainy season, when malaria and dengue fever are widely prevalent, tender leaves, boiled with tea, act as preventive against theses diseases. In case of acute fevers, a decoction of the leaves boiled with powdered cardamom in half a liter of water and mixed with sugar and milk brings down the temperature. The juice of tulsi leaves can be used to bring down fever. Extract of tulsi leaves in fresh water should be given every 2 to 3 hours. In between one can keep giving sips of cold water. In children, it is every effective in bringing down the temperature.

3. Coughs: Tulsi is an important constituent of many Ayurvedic cough syrups and expectorants. It helps to mobilize mucus in bronchitis and asthma. Chewing tulsi leaves relieves cold and flu.

4. Sore Throat: Water boiled with basil leaves can be taken as drink in case of sore throat. This water can also be used as a gargle.

5. Respiratory Disorder: The herb is useful in the treatment of respiratory system disorder. A decoction of the leaves, with honey and ginger is an effective remedy for bronchitis, asthma, influenza, cough and cold. A decoction of the leaves, cloves and common salt also gives immediate relief in case of influenza. They should be boiled in half a liter of water till only half the water is left and add then taken.

6. Kidney Stone: Basil has strengthening effect on the kidney. In case of renal stone the juice of basil leaves and honey, if taken regularly for 6 months it will expel them via the urinary tract.

7. Heart Disorder: Basil has a beneficial effect in cardiac disease and the weakness resulting from them. It reduces the level of blood cholesterol.

8. Children's Ailments: Common pediatric problems like cough cold, fever, diarrhea and vomiting respond favorably to the juice of basil leaves. If pustules of chicken pox delay their appearance, basil leaves taken with saffron will hasten them.

9. Stress: Basil leaves are regarded as an 'adaptogen' or anti-stress agent. Recent studies have shown that the leaves afford significant protection against stress. Even healthy persons can chew 12 leaves of basil, twice a day, to prevent stress. It purifies blood and helps prevent several common elements.

10. Mouth Infections: The leaves are quit effective for the ulcer and infections in the mouth. A few leaves chewed will cure these conditions.

11. Insect Bites: The herb is a prophylactic or preventive and curative for insect stings or bites. A teaspoonful of the juice of the leaves is taken and is repeated after a few hours. Fresh juice must also be applied to the affected parts. A paste of fresh roots is also effective in case of bites of insects and leeches.

12. Skin Disorders: Applied locally, basil juice is beneficial in the treatment of ringworm and other skin diseases. It has also been tried successfully by some naturopaths in the treatment of leucoderma.

13. Teeth Disorder: The herb is useful in teeth disorders. Its leaves, dried in the sun and powdered, can be used for brushing teeth. It can also be mixed with mustered oil to make a paste and used as toothpaste. This is very good for maintaining dental health, counteracting bad breath and for massaging the gums. It is also useful in pyorrhea and other teeth disorders.

14. Headaches: Basil makes a good medicine for headache. A decoction of the leaves can be given for this disorder. Pounded leaves mixed with sandalwood paste can also be applied on the forehead for getting relief from heat, headache, and for providing coolness in general.

15. Eye Disorders: Basil juice is an effective remedy for sore eyes and night-blindness, which is generally caused by deficiency of vitamin A. Two drops of black basil juice are put into the eyes daily at bedtime.

1.TO TREAT PERSONS SUFFERING FROM RINGWORM:
The affected portion is cleaned using the stack of the tulasi plant and washed with a decoction made of the holy plant in water.    A paste of the leaves is then applied to cure the desease.
2. TO TREAT SCORPIAN BITE.
A paste of tender roots of tulasi plant is applied on the affected region to reduce the toxic effect.
3.TO REDUCE PAIN DUE TO BOILS IN EAR.
A few drops of the juice is dropped into the ear and the pain is reduced.
It also reduces pain in the ears.
4. RELIEF FROM COLD.
The juice of tulasi leaves in honey is consumed to reduce cold.
5. CURE FROM SEVERE COUGH.
A decoction of tulasi , garlic and honey in equal measures is prepared and one spoon of it is taken every three hours.
6. COUGH ACCOMPANIED WITH FEVER.
Juice of tulasi with pepper relieves this.
7.TO GET RID OF PHLEGM:
Juice of tulasi with juices of onion, ginger and honey would remove phlegm.
8. TO TREAT MALARIA.
Juice of Krishnatulasi leaves is used to massage the body which acts as an antidote for shivering.     The juice of tulasi with pepper cures the fever.
9. CURING DRYNESS OF THROAT AND RESPIRATORY PASSAGE.
The decoction of Krishna tulasi in water thrice a day for 4-5 days cures this.
10, TO CURE INDIGESTION.
One spoon of juice of tulasi for two-three days twice daily cures this.
11.CURING MORNING SICKNESS.
Decoction of Krishnatulasi in water thrice daily cures this.

 

Information By various articles collected

 

Chemistry of Tulasi
by Dr. V. Sankaran Nair

In the Indian villages, shops dealing with leaves, roots, fruits and stems of plants either dried or green are common sights. Mixing the parts of these plants together in a grinding stone, kept for this purpose, they prepared medicines for common ailments. This was the practice in India and elsewhere till a hundred years ago. In the capital cities, we can find one or two such shops even these days.

With the development of science, there are several methods to extract active chemicals from indigenous plants. These neo-medicines are concealed in the chemicals in each pills, capsules and tonics stored in the medical shops.

Scientists today are paying attention to these old remedies for modern maladies. These chemist�s shops have been given way to the medical shops to meet the requirements of ever increasing number of diseases in modern times. Ever since chemists began to isolate the active chemicals contained in various plants and put them into pills or liquid medicines they began to throw new light on them.

For many centuries several plants remained the bases for the sole chemicals to meet the medical requirements of the time. Plants being virtually chemical factories, they manufacture carbohydrates, fats, proteins and the chemicals from the carbon dioxide using water and minerals available in the soil as well as air in the atmosphere and by harvesting the sun. The chemicals that they collect are stored in the leaves, stems, roots and seeds.

Knowledge of these chemicals as remedy for the ailments during the past was a chance finding. Early man used this knowledge in a primitive way, combining superstition and magic. These practices have come down to us by word of mouth and survived over the centuries. The use of charm in addition to prayers was practiced as a means to cure diseases through out the world.

            There are several plants to cite as examples in this regard. But here an attempt is made to study the case of Tualsi that in the Indian context has attained the stature of a deity for worship. The Padma Purana glorifies Tulasi as an eternal associate of Lord Krishna and considers Tulasi as the essence of all devotional activities. Its leaves, flowers, roots, bark, branches, stem and its very shade are all spiritual.

Padma Puranagives us a hint of the value of worshiping Tulasi Devi. One who with devotion applies the paste of Tulasi stem to the deity of Krishna that will ensure his close association with Krishna. The house where Tulasi Devi is present becomes purer than all holy places. Its fragrance purifies all who smell it. Lord Krishna accepts flowers, sandalwood paste or food only with the leaves of Tulasi. One who worships Lord Krishna daily with Tulasi leaves attains all kinds of austerity, charity, and sacrifice. For attaining Lord Krishna abode one should worship, remember, plant, keep, or perform kirtana before Tulasi and burn up all sinful reactions. One who worships Lord Krishna with Tulasi leaves releases all his ancestors from the realm of birth and death.

Did this way of worship served as the premise to overshadow the Indian intellectuals from the map of the scientific world for some time? Or was it the only intelligent way to explain scientific knowledge at a time when educational facilities were limited?

Atharvavedahas acknowledged the curative effect of the juice of the Tulasi leaves. On the basis of drug value Charaka classified plants into purgatives and astringents. The preeminently astringent groups are fifty in number. They have been further grouped under the heads or Vargas and included surasa (Tulasi) in the eighth varga in swasahara. Susruta on the same basis classified plants under thirty-seven sections or ganas. Susruta has included Surasa in the saka varga, the group of potherbs that comes under the spices of herbs.[1]

After making analysis, many years later, our scientists on the other extreme have categorized around 200 medical formulations from this plant. Objective, hard data obtained by designing experiments around a hypothesis has started yielding results in interpreting the phenomena of Tulasi, in contemporary scientific language.

The advent of scientific methods to examine the chemical composition of plants in the beginning of the 20th century enabled the study of the essential oils extracted from the Tulasi plant. The essential oils extracted from the five important Tulasi plants available in India were subjected to chromatography studies. This confirmed the chemical properties of these plants, which established with no doubts the medicinal properties of the plant. A list of 100 such chemicals found in these plants is appended herewith.

The pharmacologists have confirmed that the Tulasi have significant anti-stress properties. Ocimum lowered stress induced cholesterol and enzyme activities as well as it reduced blood glucose and urea levels in rats pretreated with ocimum leaf extracts. The researchers have speculated that eugenol that produced similar effects moreover lowered stress induced blood glucose levels may be responsible for the anti-stress effect of Tulasi. Stress is known to cause immunosuppression and modify host resistance to a variety of illnesses, including allergic and infectious disorders. Similar immunomodulatory activity has also been observed in Tinospora malabarica used extensively to treat constant rheumatism, inflammation and allergic disorders.[2]

In Sree Lanka Tulasi is known for its mosquito repellent substances. They burn it throughout the night in a terra-cotta ware. In fact malaria may have been one of the single most important diseases of ancient times all over the world and the practice to keep mosquitoes and other insects away by burning sulfur, pyrethrum and its derivatives were common all over the ancient world.[3]

The scientists of the Central Rice Research Institute in Cuttack (Orissa), have pointed out that the leaf extract acts as a fungicide against three fungi that cause disease in rice crops. Oil extracted from the leaves is used as a pest repellent, anti-bacterial and insecticide.[4]In some form or the other Tulasi can be used to cure many illnesses. Its oily substances are effective against tuberculosis bacteria.

The therapeutic and remedial value of the Tulasi plant has long been known and is accepted worldwide. During the change of season, human beings are most inclined to diseases. Its leaf infusion improves appetite. Tulasi is carminative, antipyretic, diaphoretic, expectorant and vermifugal. All types of fever, cough, cold, bronchitis, catarrh, dysentery, diarrhea, and gastric diseases can be cured with the help of Tulasi. It is also known for application on ear and skin. �Even that is not the end of the story, for often, subsequently, an even better drug for the purpose is found.�[5] Today science has added a new hybrid variety named Clossimum.

Tulasi is a �herb, goddess, medicine, antiseptic, health food, tonic, insect repellant, and air purifier, even your passport to heaven all rolled into one. It has been a part of our homes, our temples, our rituals, our everyday lives for centuries; a revered, beloved member of our family whom we name our daughters after.�[6]For several ailments, if a potted plant can bring a solution why not we revive the old practice of a tulasi-ttara at our home. The Tulasi is, but one of the cultural and ecological practices that we inherited from our ancestors.

List of Chemicals Available in Tulasi

Legend: Os Ocimum sanctum Linn; Og �Ocimum grattissimum  Linn; Ob-Ocimum Basillicum Linn; Ok- Ocimum Kilimandescharicum Guerke; Oa-Ocimum americannum Linn; a available; a+ available in plenty

No.

Chemicals

Os

Og

Ob

Oa

Ok

1

g - cadinine

 

 

 

a

a

2

a -Celinine

 

 

a

 

a

3

b -Farnesene

a

 

a

 

 

4

b -Filandrin

 

a

a

a

a

5

a -Pinene

a

 

a

a

a

6

b -Pinene

a

 

 

a

a

7

a -Pinene ursolic  acid

 

 

 

 

 

8

g -Selinene

a

 

 

 

 

9

b -Sitosterol       

 

 

a

a

a

10

a -Ter

 

 

 

a

 

11

a -Terpinin

a

 

a

a

 

12

Acetic acid

 

 

a

a

a

13

Aldehydes

a

a

nil

 

 

14

Apigenin

a

 

 

 

a

15

Apigenin 7 - glucuronide

a

 

 

a

 

16

Apineine

a

 

 

a

 

17

Betulinic acid

 

 

 

a

 

18

Borneol

 

a

a

 

a

19

Cadnin

 

a

 

 

 

20

Calcium

a

a

 

 

 

21

Camphin

 

 

 

a

a

22

Camphor

a

a

a

a

a

23

Carvacrol

a

a

 

a

 

24

Caryophyllin

a

a

 

a

a

25

Chavibetal

 

 

 

 

a

26

Chavicol

 

 

 

 

 

27

Cineol

a

 

a

a

a

28

Citral

 

a

 

a

a

29

Citranellol

 

a

a

a

 

30

Coriandrol

 

a

 

 

a

31

d-Arabinose

 

 

 

 

 

32

d-Camphor

 

 

 

a

a

33

d-Galactose

 

a

a

a

 

34

d-Galacturonic acid

 

a

a

a

 

35

d-Glucose

 

a

a

a

 

36

d-Limonene

 

 

 

 

a

37

d-Mannose

 

a

a

a

 

38

d-Mannuronic acid

 

a

a

 

 

39

d-Pinene

 

 

 

 

a

40

d-Xylose

 

a

a

a

 

41

Decyl aldehyde

a

 

 

 

 

42

Elimicine

a

 

 

 

 

43

Eugenol

a+

a

a

a

 

44

Eugenol caryophyllene

a

 

 

 

 

45

eugenol methyl ether

a

 

a

a

 

46

famicine

 

 

 

a

 

47

flavnoids

 

 

a

a

 

48

geraneol C10H18O

 

a

a

a

 

49

gerany acetate

 

a

 

 

 

50

glucose

 

 

a

 

 

51

glucuronide

a

 

 

 

 

52

gratismi

a

a

 

 

 

53

gratismic acid

 

a

a

a

 

54

gratissimo pinene

 

a

 

 

 

55

gratissimol

 

a

a

 

 

56

gratissimol acid

 

a

a

 

 

57

heptanone

 

 

 

a

 

58

hexoses

 

a

a

 

 

59

humulene

 

 

 

a

 

60

I arabinose

 

a

a

a

 

61

I perillyl alcohol

a

a

 

a

 

62

I ram nose

a

 

a

a

a

63

Insoluble oxalates

a

 

 

 

 

64

Iso egnenol

 

a

a

 

 

65

Isoborneol acetate

a

 

 

a

 

66

Limonene

 

 

a

 

a

67

Linalool

a+

 

a+

a

a

68

Linoleic

 

 

a

 

 

69

Lipids

 

a

a

 

 

70

Luteolin

a

 

 

 

 

71

Leteolin 7-o

a

 

 

 

 

72

Malic acid

a

 

 

 

 

73

Methyl chavicol

a

a

a+

a

 

74

Methyl cinnamate

 

 

a+

a

a

75

Methyl eugenol

a

a

a

a

 

76

Methyl heptanone

 

 

a

a

 

77

Methyl isoeugenol

 

 

 

 

 

78

Methyl nonyl ketone

a

 

 

a

 

79

Molludistin

 

 

 

a

a

80

Myrcene

 

 

 

a

a

81

Myrcine

 

 

 

 

a

82

Neolignan acid

 

 

 

a

 

83

Neolignan ocimin

 

 

 

a

 

84

Nerol

a

 

 

 

 

85

Nevadensin

 

 

 

a

 

86

Nonyl aldehyde

a

 

a

 

 

87

Ocimin

 

a

a

 

 

88

Orientin

a

 

 

 

 

89

para-Cymene

 

 

a

a

a

90

Pectolinarigenin-7methyl ether

 

 

a

 

91

Pentoses

 

a

 

 

 

92

Phenols

 

 

nil

 

 

93

Phosphorus

a

 

 

 

 

94

Polysaccharides

 

 

a

a

 

95

Sesquiterpene alcohol

 

a

 

 

 

96

Terpinene-4-ol

a

 

 

 

 

97

Terpiniyol

 

 

 

a

a

98

Thymol

 

a

 

 

 

99

Uronic acid

 

a

 

 

 

100

Ursolic acid

a

 

 

a

 

               
 

References

[1]Girija Prasanna Majumdar, Vanaspati, Plants and Palnt life as asn Indian Treatises and Traditions, University of Calcutta, 1972, pp .96, 100, 113, 118.
[2]Pharmocologists from the University College of Medical Sciences Moscow studied the effects of active principles of the Ocimum on stress-induced changes. The team studied various biomedical extents such as plasma electrolytes, metabolic substrates and enzyme activities as well as stress induced changes. It was experimented with rats showing stress induced rise in blood glucose and urea levels and other physiological changes. The Hindu, 30 Sept. 1992.
[3]M. Vannucci, Ecological Readings in the Veda, D.K. Print world, (P) Ltd., New Delhi, 1994, p. 134.
[4]Winin Pereira, Tending the earth, Traditional, sustainable agriculture in India, Earthcare Books, Bombay, 1993, pp.98, 218-219.
[5]Herbert G. Baker, Plants and Civilization, Macmillan and Co. Ltd., London, 1964, p.23.
[6]�Tulsi power�, New Indian Express, 10 November 2005.

September 24, 2006